"In a time of universal deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reality Is Nothing But A Hallucination Says A Neuroscientist

In Uncategorized on January 31, 2018 at 6:55 pm

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Oldspeak: “This is not as absurd as you may suppose at first thought. None other than America’s favorite astrophysicist/shaman/rockstar Neil DeGrasse Tyson rates the probabilty that the universe is a simulation as “very high“. Check out the linked videos and come to your own conclusions. Nisargadatta had some choice thought on this as well:

“It is your own imagination that deceives you. Without imagination there is no world. The world you perceive is made of consciousness. What you call matter is consciousness itself. You are the space (akash) in which it moves, the time in which it it lasts, and the love that gives it life.”

Ashe. -Jevon

Written By Clyde @ Fractal Enlightenment:

“We don’t just passively perceive the world; we actively generate it. The world we experience comes as much from the inside-out as the outside-in.” ~ Anil Seth

What if you were told that your reality is a hallucination? Most people would laugh it off, you can touch and pick up objects you can do everything. I believe my question would resonate better with people more familiar with Eastern philosophy.

Eastern scriptures have put forth the concept that this world is “maya” an illusion where things appear to be present but are not what they seem. Something which basically boils down to our consciousness being tricked into believing what we see, taste or smell is real.

In recent times science has been making rapid progress in understanding what consciousness is. According Anil Seth, a neuroscientist, we’re all hallucinating all the time, but when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it “reality.”

This TED talk divulges into the depths of our human nature and how we as a species use our brains to understand what is outside us like our environment and how we experience our reality by our experiences and perspectives or in other words our conditioning.

I must warn you that this video is a bit heavy as it will make you question your pre-conditioned beliefs.

Research such as this adds support to the fact that we create our reality. If you pay attention to how our brain processes information using the best guess system, it always becomes equally important about the information we feed our head.

A negative environment and information will automatically lead to negative thought patterns. The two experiments in the above video show how easy it is for us to be biased with our perspective and for some reason this also makes me question how easy it is for us to be manipulated 🙂

I believe this quote sums up what I have in mind, “Man is a hostage to the cage of cultural programming and the mass hallucination of the propagandist’s narrative illusion.” ~ James Scott, the Center for Cyber Influence Operations Studies


Related Videos:

Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | Anil Seth

2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Is the Universe a Simulation?

 

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Letting Go Of What It All Means

In Uncategorized on January 31, 2018 at 5:13 pm
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Josh Korda. Photo by Gianna Leo Falcon

Oldspeak: “Over reliance and identification with the “figuring it out” impulse leads to a repression of the physical manifestations of our reactions to life, and a delusional belief that every situation or encounter has a simple, hidden message that needs to be uncovered. We’re drawn towards these conclusions and interpretations for the illusion of control and power they represent: If we understand what a painful rejection means, we’ll never have to go through it again. For example “I’ll never ask another redhead out on a date” or “Next time I’ll only invest my money in Apple.” Of course, these beliefs can only promise protection from pain; in real life they fall short, as we’re always subject to rejection, loss, pain and discomfort.” -Josh Korda

“Ooof. This is a biggie. Cultivating non-attachement to what it “means”.  Not being attached to desired outcomes. Not being attached to “knowing why”.  WAHHHHAAATTTT……. For an INFP, cerebral, extraverted thinking, KNOW IT ALL like your humble writer, this is EXCEEDINGLY DIFFICULT. I can’t tell you the amount energy expended, suffering, rejection, loss, pain and discomfort experienced. Trying, maddeningly to “figure it out”. Unfeeling, unpresent in this body, solely focusing attention outside. Unfeeling, grasping at illusory control. Whew. Humbling and ego piercing work, letting that shit go. Was fortunate enough to practice with Josh a few times, he’s THE. SHIT. So much gratitude for the experience.” -Jevon

Written By Josh Korda @ Lion’s Roar:

Searching for hidden messages and significance in life’s encounters provides us with an illusion of control that we need to release if we want to fully feel our experiences.

The mind has a tendency to search for a meaning, an underlying message, in every murky or complex experience. It can feel like we’ve only processed and come to closure with a traumatic experience when we’ve come away with a simple interpretation for the traumatic event, a “moral to the story.”

In practice, we want to be able to report to those around us that we understand what a period of depression or confusion “was all about” and have come away “a new understanding.” After a painful and dramatic conclusion to a relationship, we might report “it was for the best, we were heading in different directions.” When someone dies, many feel the obligation to console their loved ones with “well, he lived a full life, got to a very old age, he traveled and got to see the world, etc.” We see this default wiring at work when we stand before an abstract painting, a challenging film or theater piece: What is it trying to say? What’s the message I should take away?

This search for signification and essence boils down to a preference towards filing away life’s rich experiences in terms of thoughts and messages, rather than pre-verbal feeling states, the physical, somatic sensations that arise and pass—for example the changes in breath and feeling tones in the body that occur with being overwhelmed or frustrated. Rather than getting lost in the stories of our setbacks, we can note how tightness in the jaw or shoulders expresses disappointments, or the mind’s jumpiness and agitation articulates fundamental states of confusion.

Feeling the body’s responses to difficulty is what is demanded in order to grasp life’s most troublesome events.

Over reliance and identification with the “figuring it out” impulse leads to a repression of the physical manifestations of our reactions to life, and a delusional belief that every situation or encounter has a simple, hidden message that needs to be uncovered. We’re drawn towards these conclusions and interpretations for the illusion of control and power they represent: If we understand what a painful rejection means, we’ll never have to go through it again. For example “I’ll never ask another redhead out on a date” or “Next time I’ll only invest my money in Apple.” Of course, these beliefs can only promise protection from pain; in real life they fall short, as we’re always subject to rejection, loss, pain and discomfort.

At this point we might reasonably object, well, sometimes there is an underlying warning or directive to be taken away from life’s challenges. Perhaps we find ourselves jumping too quickly into a romantic relationship, isolating ourselves from friends and losing interest in our spiritual practice, only to find the infatuation dwindle and the romance end. Isn’t it reasonable to conclude that, for the next liaison we’ll take it slower while maintaining a balanced life? Of course. But such edicts shouldn’t stand in place of feeling the loss and disappointment in its entirety; noting, feeling and allowing the hollowness in the chest or trembling lips to unfold fully.

Without truly contacting and witnessing the full articulation of loss, all our best intentions, our “go slow next time” mandates, have no weight to imprint them fully into our deeper memory stores. How many times in life do we find ourselves acting out in spite of our best wisdom and intentions? We do so because ideas don’t ingrain themselves as deeply as felt experience.

With careful practice and attuned awareness, one notes that the body registers every single encounter we have in life; beneath each event there’s a defensive resistance, a sense of attraction, or an overall disengagement; the states of like, dislike or disinterest that The Buddha referred to as Vedana. And while its impossible to notice all of these reactive sensations, we can, with practice, notice the clearest markers.  And once we truly feel life deeply, its then we can start learning from it.

 

How To Transform Your Life, Just By Breathing

In Uncategorized on January 31, 2018 at 4:22 pm

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Oldspeak: “The quality of breath directly effects the quality of our life, our health, our emotions, our mind, and our ability to feel connected…. When we practice breathing exercises, we are relaxing the parasympathetic nervous system, reducing built-up toxins in our lungs, stimulating endorphins, stimulating our pituitary gland which will activate our intuition, cleaning our blood, strengthening our electromagnetic field, expanding our lung capacity, and balancing our brain hemispheres. The benefits are truly endless…Most people breathe short and shallow breaths, which means that our digestive system is not being stimulated correctly…. If the digestive system, eliminatory system, liver, kidneys, and adrenal glands are not being stimulated and balanced, then we are more likely holding onto our ‘shit’ in more ways than one. I always like to let people know, if you breathe deep, you will be able to literally let go of the physical and mental ‘shit’ you’re holding onto in life. So, that includes physical toxins, old stories, and old patterns that are no longer serving you. – Siri Rishi Kaur

Focusing on the bio-resonator of your own breathing causes you to lose all sense of time awareness. It has a pronounced effect on your frontal lobe…. The only way to unlearn your reality is to first decondition your mind of its habitual modes of the normal perception of time. All of our life experience is threaded upon the linear axis of time. It is this axial progression in time that helps us to organize our life experience. It is a rigidly linear and unidirectional flow. Its conditioning is overwhelming. When the ingoing and outgoing breath have been equalized, a resonance is entrained in our brains that powerfully alters our perception of time from an ever onrushing linear flow to an ever expanding “isness” of a never ending now. We slip into a different space-time continuum altogether… focus on the bio-resonators of the sound of breathing is the ultimate deautomatising experience… A focus on the breathing engenders a revolution in our awareness of time, by imposing a uniformity on our experience, by doing away with the novelty and difference between one event and the next. It breaks the chain, of the succession of events which normally orders our time awareness.” –G.D. Bakshi

“Breathing in I calm my body. Breathing out, I smile. Dwelling in the present moment, I know this is a wonderful moment.” –Thich Nhat Hahn

“YAZZZZZ…. All  Is One. All Is Self. No manuals. No Gurus. No Classes. No Time. No Place. No Space. Just Breath. Decondition, Deprogram, Deautomatize, Decolonize, Disinvest in your stories about yourself and how you see the world. Divest yourself of your shit. Let. That. Shit. Go. And transform your life.  BREATHE… Deeply, slowly and presently. As often as you can. Breath is life. Definitely check out the video in the link below. Siri Rishi is SO THAT. ” -Jevon

Written By Jenna Igneri @ Nylon:

You’re probably pretty used to taking a deep breath whenever you’re feeling stressed out or overwhelmed, so it should make intuitive sense that there’s an entire practice behind using the breath to calm our minds and ease anxiety, amongst a whole slew of other benefits.

I first learned about the magic our breath holds at a wellness retreat earlier this year and instantly became enamored with its therapeutic results. Wanting to learn more, I reached out Siri Rishi Kaur—yogini, meditation facilitator, and KRI Kundalini teacher, who has 26 years of experience in breathing exercises and awareness of the breath under her belt (erm, perfectly flowy jumpsuit)—to show me the ropes.

Despite what you may think, breathwork is a lot more than just taking a few deep breathes to calm your nerves—much more. “The quality of breath directly effects the quality of our life, our health, our emotions, our mind, and our ability to feel connected,” says Rishi. “When we practice breathing exercises, we are relaxing the parasympathetic nervous system, reducing built-up toxins in our lungs, stimulating endorphins, stimulating our pituitary gland which will activate our intuition, cleaning our blood, strengthening our electromagnetic field, expanding our lung capacity, and balancing our brain hemispheres. The benefits are truly endless.”

Breathing exercises, referred to as Pranayam in the yogic tradition (meaning the science of breath, with “prana” standing for our life force or highest quality of energy), dates back to the beginning of civilization. “The oral teachings of yoga were codified and written several thousand years ago by Patanjali. The breath is the foundation of our life and of every yogic practice. No matter what style you’re teaching or practicing, it all begins and ends with the breath,” says Rishi.

According to Rishi, you can easily incorporate breathwork into your day by creating a simple routine of sitting and practicing long, deep breaths first thing in the morning or before going to bed to center your energy. Better yet, you can bring it right to your work or school day. In fact, as Rishi explains, some breathwork exercises are simple enough to do at our desks—or anywhere. “You can work on it by applying your awareness to your breath anywhere and anytime. It can be as simple as taking 10 long deep breathes, three times a day.”

“One thing we can all do is set aside small periods throughout the day where we practice a breathing technique for one to three minutes and observe how much more aware we are and how much easier it is to practice being mindful. The more mindful we are, the more compassionate we will be as a society.” If you’re someone that barely gets up from your desk, think of it as the perfect way to clear your mind in the middle of a hectic day.

Of course, you can aim for a deeper, more intensive practice, such as sitting for an hour and taking only one breath per minute. According to Rishi, there are hundreds of breathing exercises just in Kundalini yoga alone that work to do everything, from cleansing the breath and balancing the glandular nervous system to assisting in meditation.

Breathwork helps us become more present and aware, which, as Rishi explains, allows us to use our “neutral brain,” which makes us less likely to react to stressful scenarios. “Breathing exercises reduce anxiety and fear, which stems from the fight-or-flight part of our brain,” she says.

Why should we try it? “Because it’s the coolest thing on the planet to be centered, mentally stable, mentally flexible, sharp, open-hearted, in touch with our emotions in a balanced way, calm, and aware—in other words, mindful. Breathing exercises can give us an awareness that changes our whole vibrational field, and it’s easy, accessible, and free. It’s your breath!” Well, we can’t argue that.

Another reason to practice breathwork? We’re probably already breathing incorrectly. “Most people breathe short and shallow breaths, which means that our digestive system is not being stimulated correctly,” says Rishi. “If the digestive system, eliminatory system, liver, kidneys, and adrenal glands are not being stimulated and balanced, then we are more likely holding onto our ‘shit’ in more ways than one. I always like to let people know, if you breathe deep, you will be able to literally let go of the physical and mental ‘shit’ you’re holding onto in life. So, that includes physical toxins, old stories, and old patterns that are no longer serving you.”

Above, watch as Rishi takes us through five different breathing exercises to help do everything, from focusing harder to dispelling our “imaginary disabilities.” Whether you make them a part of your at-home morning or before-bed routines or use them as a midday quick fix in the office bathroom (hey, no judgment), treat the above as your intro to the healing world of breathwork. “The most important thing to remember is that your breath is the only element that your mind will obey. If you learn how to control your breath, you will be able to control your mind and your emotions. You’ll be able to stay in your venter in the midst of chaos,” says Rishi. Sounds good to us.

You can find Siri Rishi at RaMa Intitute and Five Pillars Yoga in NYC and Mandala Yoga Center in East Hampton, New York, or check out her free lifelabsrk videos on her website.

Credits:
Camera: Dani Okon and Grace Kenney
Sound: Drew Joy
Editor: Dylan Pailes-Friedman
Producer: Maura Gaughan
Clothes by Dana Foley NYC
Stylist: Ximena Balmori